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Taku

Taku

Gunalchéesh/Thank You

By Andrew Corcilius of Northland College Thank you for letting us visit the glacier  and giving us the opportunity to see Grizzly and Moose tracks along the shoreline of the glacial lake as I very well will never have that…

Taku

Howling and Searching

The group fans out and I find myself drawn to murmurs and shouts of more scat peppered throughout this flat and open terrain. Dr. Watine visits each person and I notice a smile curling on her lips. She marches proudly to the front of the group and clears her throat “This might very well be a wolf rendezvous site…” An explosion of whispers erupts between us but is quickly silenced by Dr. Watine “…and therefore I will be performing a wolf call in an attempt to bring some in.”

Taku

Temp Logger Hide-and-Seek

The process is simple; find the temperature loggers, which are small devices buried underneath rocks that track temperature data over a year and download the data onto a computer for research. Probably sounds easy to anyone who hasn’t looked for a temperature logger before. But the catch is, one of them is always nearly impossible to find.  It’s like a game of hide and seek with your friends, but one of them goes into the yard and digs a hole in the ground to hide. 

Taku

Nightjars

By Gabriel Falcione from University of Vermont Being a nocturnal animal as far north as Atlin, British Columbia seems to be an oxymoron. With less than 5 hours of darkness, being active mostly at night doesn’t seem advantageous, yet the…

Taku

Within Community and Place

The plants begin to consume your mind, you walk with your eyes constantly scanning the ground for the tracks of who may have been here before you. There’s this feeling when you began to understand an ecosystem. It is almost as is you start to move through these spaces as if you are one with it, rather than above it.

Taku

Week One on Taku River Tlingit Territory

Conservation is one language. To speak it is to approach the natural landscape through a valuable scientific lens. But we cannot account for the words our language misses. The cultural and historical connections, the footers at the end of the page. This highlights the importance of incorporating traditional ecological knowledge, such as Nyman’s, into conservation efforts. The more knowledge that can be compiled, the more likely we will be to truly conserve these landscapes in their entirety, not just in the language we understand.

Taku

Final Blog, Taku 2022

by Madeline Waterman of the University of Vermont When our group first arrived around 2 a.m. at the Whitehorse Airport, everyone was bleary-eyed, hesitant to make conversation, and more than a little anxious about the onslaught of mosquitoes we were…

Taku

Journey to the Southern End of Atlin Lake

by Alex Railic of the University of Vermont In the first week of arriving in Atlin, there was some discussion about our group arriving at the south end of Atlin Lake – an area rarely visited by even the locals,…

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Hello from British Columbia!

By Talia Loiter of the University of Vermont The first two-ish weeks here have absolutely flown by. It seems like the program is about a 3rd of the way over before having even really started. Life in Atlin is pretty…

Taku

Ashlynd in Atlin

By Ashlynd Greenwood of Weber State University Barry Lopez in “A Literature of Place” once asked, how is it that one can occupy a space and also have it occupy you? Lopez continued on this thought by mentioning the act…

Taku

Gunelchéesh

by Kyle Weber, of Truman State University It’s only been a few days since the last blog entry, but in that time, it seems that so many lasts have happened. On Thursday we drove out to Consolation Creek to go on…

Taku

Gloria, GLORIA!

by Katherine Meyr, of Weber State University photos by Adam Spencer, Round River Instructor Over the course of our 6 weeks in B.C. we’ve been working on GLORIA (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments). GLORIA is an internationally recognized methodology…

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Fishing for Meaning: Part 3

by Joey Abreu, of Northland College photos by Adam Spencer, Round River Instructor The confluence, where the light and the dark meet. We can learn from this. A river confluence, where two rivers meet and move forward together, is something…

Taku

Spirit of the Bear: Part 2

by Joey Abreu, of Northland College photos by Adam Spencer, Round River Instructor Brown fur glistening, Grizzly wades through the water. Poised, intelligent I woke up this morning to the sound of the river flowing, and the cool damp feeling…

Taku

The Journey to the Nakina River: Part 1

by Joey Abreu, of Northland College photos by Adam Spencer, Round River Instructor Water flows freely Bears roam the open landscape This is the Taku The Taku River watershed in Northwestern British Columbia is a beautiful flowing landscape, home of…

Taku

Some Short Observations

Myranda Sloo, Carleton College. Photos by Adam Spencer, Round River Instructor. It only took me a few days to realize that it’s almost impossible not to live in the present up here where cell service is nonexistent, and wildlife is abundant….